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Study findings show that people who sleep 5 hours or less a night are at higher risk of health problems.

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Related video above: Frequent napers may experience health problems A large new study published in the journal Evidence that people 50 and older who sleep five hours or less a night are at higher risk of developing multiple chronic diseases as they age, compared to their peers who sleep longer. provides. The study, published Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine, took a closer look at a group of nearly 8,000 civil servants aged 50 years in the UK with no chronic illness. Clinical examinations every four to five years for the next 25 years. For those whose sleep was tracked at age 50, those who slept five hours or less a night were more at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases over time. slept at least seven hours a night. The risk was 32% higher at age 60 and 40% higher at age 70. Diseases at higher risk include diabetes, cancer, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, liver disease, depression, dementia, mental disorders, Parkinson’s and arthritis. Video below: Feeling tired? Here are ways to get a good night’s sleep. Other research has shown that adults who don’t get enough sleep, about seven to nine hours a night, have a higher chance of developing chronic diseases, including obesity and high blood pressure, according to the US Centers. For Disease Control and Prevention. Unlike other studies, the new research did not find that those who slept more than nine hours had health problems, but few people in the study got that much sleep, which may have affected the results. additional limitations. Most of the subjects were white men; only one-third were women. Officers tend to be slightly healthier than the general population, the researchers say. And the study relied on people’s self-reported data, which is considered less reliable than in a sleep study where scientists can directly observe how the person sleeps. chronic disease and the onset of multiple morbidity,” the study concluded. “These findings support the promotion of good sleep hygiene in both primary and secondary prevention by targeting behavioral and environmental conditions that affect sleep duration and quality.” Sharon, who was a sleep researcher and was not involved in the new study. “It’s important because it provides more evidence that sleep and chronic conditions are related,” Cobb said. affects it,” says Cobb, director of pre-graduate nursing programs and associate professor in the Mervyn M. Dymally School of Nursing at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. Los Angeles.Cobb points out that while duration of sleep matters, so does quality—a factor this study didn’t address. The study also doesn’t explain what might cause chronic discomfort among people who sleep five hours or less. Other research shows that sleep is a restorative process that, among other things, produces and regulates hormones in the body, Adam explains. Knowlden, an associate professor of health sciences at the University of Alabama, who was not involved in the new research but is working on a different large sleep study. Video below: Six steps to better sleep Hormones appetite, metabolism, sex drive, blood pressure and heart rate, body temperature, and circadian rhythms. If the body cannot produce enough hormones due to lack of sleep, this is thought to lead to chronic health problems such as fatigue, body aches and blood pressure problems. Research shows that sleep deprivation can also increase. inflammation is the body’s natural defense against infection or injury. Temporary inflammation works well to protect the body, but if chronic, it can lead to multiple diseases. “Most research shows that your quality of life really improves if you get enough sleep.” Knowlden said she made several suggestions when people told her they had trouble sleeping. First, consistent sleep Create a schedule. Training your body to go to bed and get up at the same time each day makes it easier to get a regular night’s sleep. The bedroom should be dark, quiet, and free of pets that can interfere with sleep. Caffeine, alcohol, and large meals before bedtime. Exercise throughout the day do at night It can also lead to better sleep. “The more we can encourage people to get a better night’s sleep, the better,” Knowlden said. “Sleep affects everything.”

Related video above: Frequent naps may experience health issues

A large new study published today provides evidence that people 50 and older who sleep five hours or less a night are at higher risk of developing multiple chronic diseases as they age, compared with their peers who get a longer night’s sleep.

The study, published Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine, took a closer look at a group of nearly 8,000 civil servants aged 50 years in the UK with no chronic disease. The scientists asked participants to report how long they slept in the clinic. Examinations every four to five years for the next 25 years.

For those whose sleep is monitored at age 50, people who sleep five hours or less a night have a 30% higher risk of developing multiple chronic diseases over time than those who sleep at least seven hours a night. The risk was 32% higher at age 60 and 40% higher at age 70.

Diseases at higher risk included diabetes, cancer, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, liver disease, depression, dementia, mental disorders, Parkinson’s and arthritis.

Video below: Feeling tired? Here’s how to get a good night’s sleep

Other research has shown that adults who don’t get enough sleep (about seven to nine hours a night) have a higher chance of developing chronic diseases, including obesity and high blood pressure, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Unlike other studies, the new research did not find that those who slept more than nine hours had health problems, but few people in the study got that much sleep, which may have affected the results.

The study has some additional limitations. Most of the subjects were white men; only one-third were women. Officers tend to be slightly healthier than the general population, the researchers say. And the study relied on people’s self-reported data, which is considered less reliable than in a sleep study where scientists can directly observe how the person sleeps.

The study concluded that “Short sleep duration in middle age and old age is associated with a higher risk of chronic disease onset and multiple morbidity.” “These findings support the promotion of good sleep hygiene in both primary and secondary prevention by targeting behavioral and environmental conditions that affect sleep duration and quality.”

Sharon Cobb, who works on sleep research and was not involved in the new study, said this is important as it provides more evidence that sleep and chronic conditions are related.

“I think we’ve emphasized for a long time that you need sleep. But now we’re really starting to move forward. There’s more literature on how sleep affects more than mental health. It also affects more comorbidities,” says Mervyn M at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles. said Cobb, who is director and associate professor of pre-graduate nursing programs at the Dymally School of Nursing.

Cobb points out that while duration of sleep matters, so does quality—a factor this study didn’t catch. The study also does not explain what may cause chronic conditions in people who sleep five hours or less.

Adam Knowlden, an associate professor of health sciences at the University of Alabama, who was not involved in the new research, explains that other research shows that sleep is a restorative process, among other things that make and regulate hormones in the body. working on a different big sleep study.

Video below: Six steps to sleep better

Hormones regulate things like appetite, metabolism, sex drive, blood pressure and heart rate, body temperature, and circadian rhythms. If the body cannot produce enough hormones due to lack of sleep, this is thought to lead to chronic health problems such as fatigue, body aches and blood pressure problems.

Research shows that a lack of sleep can also increase inflammation, which is the body’s natural defense against infection or injury. Temporary inflammation works well to protect the body, but if it is chronic, it can lead to multiple diseases.

“Sleep is always one of the biggest pieces of the equation for people’s well-being,” Knowlden says. Said.

“Often people view the need for sleep as an inconvenience. They think about getting the most out of life, they need to deprive themselves of sleep to get ahead or be more social, but actually it’s the opposite,” he said. . “Most of the research shows that your quality of life really improves if you get enough sleep.”

Knowlden said she offered a few pieces of advice when people told her they had trouble sleeping.

First, establish a consistent sleep schedule. Training your body to go to bed and wake up at the same time each day facilitates a regular night’s rest.

The bedroom should be dark, quiet and free of pets that can interfere with sleep.

Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and large meals before bed. Exercising during the day can also lead to better sleep at night.

“The more we can encourage people to get a better night’s sleep, the better,” Knowlden said. “Sleep affects everything.”

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